Slow Pulp Will Sweep You Up With Their New EP Big Day

Chill, shoegaze-y band, Slow Pulp, want you to feel like every day is a big day. The foursome’s new EP Big Day swells with tingly memories and childhood experiences, fitting seamlessly with gloomy jangles and moments of plush fuzz. 

Photo by: Rachel Cabitt

Photo by: Rachel Cabitt

Hailing from Madison, Wisconsin but now residing in Chicago— Emily Massey, Alex Leeds, Henry Stoehr and Teddy Mathews have been Slow Pulp since 2017. Their first EP called EP2 was released that year, and a few tracks like “At Home” and “Steel Birds” surfaced intermittently between then and now. Compared to EP2, Big Day’s tracks would probably swelter in 2017. Slow Pulp’s sound has both cooled and slowed down, while still remaining heavily textured and free flowing. 

Big Day begins with the euphoric and pulsing track “Do You Feel It.” The song pushes from a glistening, soft space to a place of mobility and action. It is the grand opener to get you hyped about what is to follow. The next track “New Media,” is on the brink of being 80s-infused or inspired, but Massey’s crystal-clear voice reflects today. She sings about altering old habits, or perhaps mannerisms that have been a part of her from a young age. “I can't seem to break the fence/Overacted in all my plans/I won't think to change the pace/Runnin' on the same mistakes.”

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My personal favorite, “High,” is the roughest (a.k.a. fuzziest) song on the EP. Similar to “Do You Feel It,” the track has an amazing build up, and the brief, yet aching wait is well worth it. Massey sways listeners in the first verse until wailing riffs and distortion find their way through the bursting cracks. The closer “Young World,” is painfully beautiful in every aspect, from melody and movement to lyricism. Massey balances singing about newness or being “young” with lyrics that elaborate on the experiences we have throughout life, even once we’re no longer considered a child. Slow Pulp remind us that we can hold onto the feelings of youth by appreciating the moments in which we are experiencing something new for the first time. Big days will always be ahead. 

-Allison Kridle

Delaney Motter